Leadership

William J. Clinton Fellowship for Service in India

Signature Program

FAQ

Signature Program

Fellows

Signature Program

Selection Criteria

Signature Program

Serve. Learn. Lead.

Frequently Asked Questions

William J. Clinton Fellowship for Service in India

About the Program

The AIF Clinton Fellowship is an immersive, 10-month volunteer service program matching young professionals with development organizations. Fellows work on scalable and sustainable development projects in the fields of education, livelihoods, technology and innovation, and public health.

The AIF Clinton Fellowship is helping to shape the next generation of leaders committed to positive change while also strengthening civil society in both the US and India.

Through collaboration and capacity-building, fellows, mentors, and civil society leaders form dynamic partnerships to capacity-build, exchange knowledge and skills, and share a mutual passion for advancing social and economic development. Fellows serve from September 2017 to July 2018 with development organizations across India.

AIF Clinton Fellowship Application Process from American India Foundation on Vimeo.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Fellows support AIF partner organizations at a crucial moment of scalability by meeting their human resource and organizational needs through skills-sharing, training, and capacity-building. Responsibilities vary based on a Fellow’s skills, experience, and interests. Previous projects have included: program design and implementation, monitoring and evaluation, graphic design, videography, data collection and visualization, developing digital content, event planning, qualitative and quantitative research, creative writing, curriculum design, fundraising, teaching, training teachers, community organizing, managing information systems, and marketing and communications.

Each Fellow is paired with a mentor at the host organization and with a mentor at AIF for support throughout the project. During the selection process, we take note of the skill sets and career aspirations of potential Fellows to match them with appropriate AIF partner organizations.

Supporting Change Makers

The Fellowship creates a community of socially engaged, global citizens dedicated to positive change. Fellowship Alumni have traditionally applied their leadership in the areas of international development, education, social entrepreneurship, technology, business, academia, journalism, public health, human rights, and others. Together they represent a collective force for sustaining a long-term agenda dedicated towards change in India, the United States, and beyond. The AIF Clinton Fellowship provides a renowned platform to develop the skills, resources, and network needed to become an effective and socially-minded change maker.

Learn More

FAQ

Application

Who is Eligible To Apply?

What kind of educational background and skills are required?

What are the language requirements?

How does the application process work?

What are the short essay questions?

What if I cannot make it to an in-person interview due to being outside the USA or India?

How many references does aif require?

Do I Need to Submit Letters of Recommendation?

How does placement with a host organization work?

Can I apply for a Fellowship and work at an organization of my choice that is not a partner of AIF?

Program Questions

What are the Fellowship requirements?

Does AIF pay for my living expenses?

Do Fellows travel for their projects?

Will I get to travel while I am in India? What is the vacation policy?

What happens if I get sick? Get into an accident? What health facilities and support exist?

What happens during orientation? What are midpoint and endpoint?

GENERAL

What are some examples of successful Fellowship projects?

What skills are you looking for in projects?

Will AIF support language training before or during the Fellowship?

What are Alumni doing now?

Can I speak to a staff member?

What do you expect of fellows?

APPLICATION

Who is eligible to apply?

Candidates must:
• Be a U.S. or Indian citizen, or a U.S. permanent resident
• Be between the ages of 21 and 34 on September 1, 2017
• Have completed an undergraduate degree before the start of the program on September 1, 2017

What kind of educational background and skills are required?

We seek applicants from a variety of backgrounds, both professionally and personally.

Candidates should demonstrate a deep interest, passion, and commitment to social and economic development in India. Candidates must show humility and an eagerness to learn within a cross-cultural context. Ideal candidates possess strong professional skills, relevant volunteer or other practical experience, and applicable academic credentials or training. They show a potential for leadership and are entrepreneurial, innovative, and creative in finding solutions and navigating unknown environments.

Candidates must be flexible and adaptable, and possess exceptional ability to build meaningful relationships across cultures in the social development space. A sensitivity and ability to work with vulnerable communities, as well as the humility and passion to “learn by doing” is essential.

Although proficiency in an Indian language is not required to apply, it is highly desirable.

 


What are the language requirements?

Fluency in English is required. It is not a requirement for Fellows to speak the local language, however it is considered a valuable skill in the selection process and taken into consideration when placing Fellows with AIF partner organizations. If accepted into the program, Fellows may be eligible to receive some language training in a local language.


How does the application process work?

The application is a high competitive, multi-stage process consisting of an application; an interview and references for long-listed applicants; and a project-based interview process for short-listed applicants. Applications open annually in the Fall for the program cycle the following year (September – June). The application consists of a series of essays and questionswhich are hosted online. After the application period closes, the applications are reviewed by AIF staff and stakeholders in both the United States and India

The longlisted candidates will be invited for an in-person interview held in select cities in the United States and India, and will be asked to submit two references prior to the interview.. Successful candidates will be notified of their qualification to the shortlist, enabling them to apply for individual projects in the project portal. AIF and its partner organizations will interview candidates for each position. Based on these interviews and an assessment of which candidates are best suited for individual projects, the final Fellowship class will be selected. Fellows will officially be admitted and offered a place into the program in late April/early May.

For more information on the application and selection process, including a timeline, please visit our Apply page.

What are the short essay questions?

The essay questions are designed to help us understand the knowledge, skills and qualifications that you will bring to the Fellowship. We also want to get to know you better and to find out what motivates you.

When planning your answers, emphasize your experience and qualifications most relevant to the Fellowship. If you are currently working full-time, you may wish to highlight any relevant professional experience. If you are a recent graduate, you may wish to focus on any relevant academic and volunteer experience. Think broadly about your experience and how it relates to the fellowship. Use examples and avoid generalizations. For each question, be as specific as possible, drawing from your experience.

Question 1: Share your story. Why do you want to serve in India as an AIF Clinton Fellow at this moment in your life? (350 words or less)
In your answer, address the following: What brought you here? How does this experience fit into your larger professional and individual development? Why do you specifically want to apply to the AIF Clinton Fellowship? 

Question 2: Share your philosophy of service. (250 words or less)
In your answer, address the following: What does service mean to you? Why do you want to serve? What specific experiences have shaped your philosophy of service? What motivates you when serving people and communities?

Question 3: Outline three (3) skills that you would apply during the course of this Fellowship when working with communities in development. (250 words or less)
Please give concrete examples of how you learned each of these skills. What or who motivated you to learn these skills?

Question 4: Tell us about a time when you had to navigate a new, unknown or unfamiliar environment. (250 words or less)
In your answer, address the following: What challenges did you face? What did you do to cope? What were some of the lessons you learned? What remain areas that you continue to struggle with?

Question 5: Taking a broader look at development, please respond to the following questions. In your response, please relate and explain how you think these ideas will influence and shape your ten (10) months in service. (350 words or less)
Address the following: Is progress intrinsic to development? Some development initiatives are successful and some aren’t. Even when a problem has been identified, why is there sometimes no tangible change or effect? In your experience and observation, does everyone get an equal voice in deciding what development means for their community and/or country?  

What if I cannot make it to an in-person interview due to being outside the USA or India?

If candidates are in the U.S. and India, they will be required to attend the in-person interview to continue their candidacy. If the candidate is not in the U.S. or India, then AIF staff will work with the candidate for an alternate means of conducting the interview.

 

HOW MANY REFERENCES DOES AIF REQUIRE?

AIF requires two references. You will be asked to submit your references only if you make it to the interview round. We will contact candidates and ask them to provide your references in the online application portal. Your references will be asked to complete an online form that evaluates your ability to succeed on the Fellowship. Your references should be able to address your work ethic, your cultural adaptability, your communication skills and work style, and your career goals. We request that you provide references familiar with you in a professional or volunteer setting. References can not be family, relatives or friends.


Do I Need to Submit Letters of Recommendation?

No, we do not require recommendation letters. Instead, we will ask you to provide us with two references from a professional or volunteer setting to complete an online form evaluating your skills, abilities, and preparedness for the Fellowship.

 

How does placement with a host organization work?

During the selection process, we take note of the skill sets and career aspirations of potential Fellows to match them with appropriate AIF partner organizations. Once selected, we ask finalists to apply for projects in the project application portal opening in late March/early April. The project application portal will outline each project, describe the host organization, and provide details about needed skills, roles, and responsibilities. Each finalist is able to apply for up to three projects. AIF and its partner organizations will interview candidates for each position, and make a decision about the final match. Fellows are officially being admitted into the program in late April/early May at the conclusion of the matching process.

Can I apply for a Fellowship and work at an organization of my choice that is not a partner of AIF?

No, you can only apply for projects offered by pre-vetted AIF partner organizations. This is done to ensure that the organization will be able to provide the level of support expected by AIF and will be invested in the professional growth of Fellows they host.

 

 

PROGRAM QUESTIONS


What are the Fellowship requirements?

Fellows are expected to complete the following during their 10 months of service in India:

• Meeting or exceeding expectations of the Fellowship, including upholding your commitment to AIF and your host organization

• Participation at Orientation, Midpoint, and Endpoint, and Thematic Conference

• Adherence to the policies and agreements between Fellow, AIF and partner organizations

• Full completion of the 10 month Fellowship program

• Timely submission of monthly and quarterly reports and deliverables

• Completion of at least 10 posts on the AIF Fellowship blog

• Prompt settlement of finances and logistical items throughout the fellowship

• Completion of end of service documents and presentations

All Fellows are expected to complete the full ten months of service, while upholding basic values and principles of trust, honesty, and integrity. Fellows are expected to embrace and engage with multiple challenges, and take a lot of initiative in the structuring and completion of their projects.
Fellows must abide by host organization work calendars and work complete workweeks in accordance with organizational policy and procedure, which commonly involves working Saturdays.


Does AIF pay for my living expenses?

For U.S. Fellows, AIF provides a roundtrip ticket from their point of origin to India, along with insurance coverage and a monthly living stipend. For Indian Fellows, AIF provides domestic travel from their hometowns in India, insurance coverage, and a monthly living stipend. Please note that the stipend is not a salary, but a living stipend designed to enable Fellows to volunteer in India. The stipend covers basic living expenses such as rent, meals and incidentals, and local transportation related to a Fellows’ project. It is designed to allow Fellows a local lifestyle comparable to that of other local staff at their host organizations. The stipend does not cover personal entertainment, non-program related travel, luxury items, or alcoholic beverages. Candidates should plan on bringing additional funds to allow for personal travel and other non-essential items. The amount will depend entirely on your personal spending habits.


Do Fellows travel for their projects?

Travel depends entirely on the project and the AIF partner organization. Some placements require travel to villages in surrounding areas for fieldwork, while others are more administrative, requiring little to no travel within an office setting. Again others may require constant travel to various partner offices and/or field sites. When selecting preferences for projects, Fellows should carefully consider whether they have any restrictions to frequent travel and might need to be based in one place.


Will I get to travel while I am in India? What is the vacation policy?

Yes, Fellows are allowed to travel as far and as long it does not interfere with their projects.

Fellows are entitled to a certain amount of personal leave throughout the program. We strongly discourage Fellows from taking leave during the first six and the last six weeks of the program. Taking leave during these critical phases may jeopardize cross-cultural immersion at the beginning of the project, and disrupt the completion of the project at the end.

Participants are expected to remain in India for the entire duration of the program. Out of country travel is not permitted during the course of the 10-month Fellowship.


What happens if I get sick? Get into an accident? What health facilities and support exist?

AIF Fellows are enrolled in a travel health insurance policy for the duration of the program. As health and safety issues vary by region, AIF hosts aa two-week Orientation that includes extensive health and safety training for Fellows at the beginning of the program. The host organization will be responsible for helping Fellows arrange for proper care in case of ill health. If a serious health condition arises, AIF will ensure that the Fellow has full support.


What happens during orientation? What are midpoint and endpoint?

Fellows are expected to participate at four different programmatic conferences during the 10-month program: Orientation, Midpoint, Thematic Conferences, and Endpoint. These conferences are an integral part of the Fellowship and offer a space for meaningful connection, engaged reflection, as well as personal and professional development.

Orientation marks the official beginning of the Fellowship and is hosted by AIF in New Delhi. Spending nearly two weeks together before Fellows depart to their host sites, Fellows are prepared for their year of service. Orientation covers everything from team building to setting expectations, explaining policies, preparing for your project, navigating cultural adaptation in your host site, and guidance on how to immerse in your host community. You will also meet your AIF and host organization mentors for the first time, and attend workshops and panels on development in India.

Midpoint is an integral part of the Fellowship, which intends to offer a space of meaningful connection, engaged reflection, exchange and capacity-building, as well as personal and professional development. During Midpoint, Fellows will be given the opportunity to exchange and reflect on their experiences with each other and AIF. By sharing each other’s experiences and observations through formal presentations, there will also be opportunity to use this energy and insight to clarify both personal intentions and professional goals for the remainder of the Fellowship. During Midpoint, AIF also evaluates a Fellow’s progress in alignment with the project plan and goals, and offer feedback on points to improve or work on.

In the second half of the Fellowship, the cohort breaks into three smaller groups to proceed onwards to Thematic Conferences held across India in the areas of Public Health, Livelihoods, and Education. The purpose of the Thematic Conferences is to expose Fellows to another aspect of the development field they have been working in through the half of their Fellowship, and to give additional insight and perspective on their ongoing work at their host organization.

Endpoint is the culmination conference that marks the end of the Fellowship. Fellows share their projects, reflect on their experiences, and discuss next steps as program alumni. Endpoint kicks off with a dynamic development conference where each Fellow will prepare a presentation encapsulating their project, their observations, as well as their professional and personal growth. The conference will be attended by AIF staff, programmatic partners, host organizations, guest speakers, and other members of the wider development community in India. Upon the conclusion of the conference, the Fellowship class will be honored by a completion ceremony.

 

GENERAL


What are some examples of successful Fellowship projects?

• Develop and implement a monitoring and evaluation system to assess the social impact of employability and education programs.

• Design, develop, and disseminate a health and hygiene curriculum, including the promotion of awareness around menstrual health and hygiene.

• Design and facilitate a business and entrepreneurship program for rural women; fostered the immersion of several small-scale business designed and run entirely by rural women.

• Setup and facilitate a support group for women affected by domestic violence. Developing a manual and methodology on how the support group should be conducted on monthly/bi-monthly basis.

 

What skills are you looking for in projects?

Fellows support AIF partner organizations at a crucial moment of scalability through project based collaboration, skills-sharing, training, and capacity-building. Responsibilities vary based on a Fellow’s skills, experience, and interests. Skills needed in projects may include but are not limited to: program design and implementation, monitoring and evaluation, graphic design, videography, data collection and visualization, digital content development, event planning, qualitative and quantitative research, creative writing, curriculum design, fundraising, teaching, training teachers, community organizing, managing information systems, and marketing and communications.


 

Will AIF support language training before or during the Fellowship?

Depending on the language required to complete a project, AIF may provide some language training in a local language for Fellows before the start of their project. Decisions are made on a case-by-case basis. The aim of language training is to allow a Fellow to gain basic language skills to immerse themselves in the project and in their host community. Candidates may also choose to hire a local language tutor if they desire to expand their expertise in the local language.


What are Alumni doing now?

With almost 400 graduates, AIF Fellowship Alumni have followed a diversity of career and life paths. Many have continued on to pursue graduate studies including Masters and Doctoral work in areas such as urban planning, public health, and international development. Alumni have also gone on to professional schools including law, education and medicine. Others have started their own social ventures or chosen to join the development sector in India and the United States, including several alumni who have founded their own enterprises that now host incoming Fellows. Some alumni have returned to jobs they held before the Fellowship period, while others embark upon new professional paths, including work in the public sector (government agencies such as the Department of State), private (law, venture capital)in both countries.

Can I speak to a staff member?

We are happy to provide you with assistance during the application process. If you would like to speak with a staff member in the U.S. or India, please contact us and specify your questions and areas on which you need clarification or support. Due to the volume of application, we ask that you email us your questions first and provide your phone number for follow-up. We aim to respond to your query within 48 hours. Please not that our business hours in the U.S. and India offices are Monday through Friday from 9am-6pm.


 

What do you expect of fellows?

As a Fellow, you are considered an official ambassador for AIF and the AIF Clinton Fellowship Program at all times. You are expected to act as such with dignity, responsibility, and respect. You are expected to upload our values and honor our mission. Anything you say and do while a Fellow will not only reflect on you individually, but also on the Fellowship and AIF as a whole. Being in this role carries a lot of responsibility.

Fellows

Current Fellows –2016-17

Abigail Ter Haar – Sparsha Trust (Public Health)

Adil Hussain – Lok Sahbhagi Sansthan (Livelihoods)

Annika Gage – Gramin Shiksha Kendra (Public Health)

Audra Bass – Keystone Foundation (Livelihoods)

Avan Antia – Madras Crocodile Bank Trust (MCBT) (Technology/Innovation)

Avital Datskovsky – Gramin Shiksha Kendra (Education)

Benjamin Joseph – SAFA (Technology/Innovation)

Cal Brackin – Kattaikuttu Sangam (Education)

Caleb Christian – AIF, Learning and Migration Program (LAMP) (Education)

Deepa Patil – Reaching Hand (Public Health)

Denise Fernandes – Manthan (Technology/Innovation)

Dharamjeet Kumar – North-East Affected Area, Development Society (NEADS) (Livelihoods)

Dylan Igoe – St. Xaviers (Education)

Erin Tatz – Janaagraha (Technology/Innovation)

Janan Dave – Bempu (Technology/Innovation)

Keith Scott – AIF, Digital Equalizer (Technology/Innovation)

Lakshmee Sharma – Gene Campaign (Livelihoods)

Maura Deignan – Shaishav (Education)

Nadeem Alam – Swapath Trust (Education)

Nisha Sambamurty – Bombay Foundation (Public Health)

Nitish Chiniwar – My Angel’s Academy (Education)

Noel Joseph – Shaishav (Education)

Nolberto Zubia – Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (Law and Advocacy)

Olivia Waring – People’s Archive of Rural India (PARI) (Technology/Innovation)

Palak Dudani – Medha (Technology/Innovation)

Pious Ahuja – Counsel to Secure Justice (Law and Advocacy)

Sarala Kal – Organisation for Rural Development (PORD) (Public Health)

Sumedha Goswami – Salaam Mumbai Foundation  (Public Health)

Timothy Hefflinger – Snow Leopard Conservancy India Trust (SLC-IT) (Livelihoods)

Trip Eggert – Organization for Early Literacy Promotion (OELP) (Technology/Innovation)

Yasin Khan – Broadleaf (Public Health)

2015-16

Akshay Surendra – Reap Benefit (Education)

Alyssa Russo – Learning and Migration Program (Education)

Ambika Roos – KHAMIR (Livelihoods)

Amy Jicha – Counsel to Secure Justice (Human Rights)

Aparna Nutakki – Adharshila (Public Health)

Atharva Setu – Yuwa (Education)

Benita Mahanta – WASSAN/SwitchON (Livelihoods)

Benson Neethipudi – Wadhwani Foundation (Livelihoods)

Camila Lemaster-Esquivel – Profugo (Public Health)

Cheryl Blake – Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (Human Rights)

Christopher Witschy – American India Foundation (Media)

Crysty Skevington – Utthan (Human Rights)

Falak Choksi – Naz Foundation (Human Rights/Gender)

Fatima Salman – Broadleaf Health and Education Alliance (Public Health)

Janice D’Souza – KC Mahindra Education Trust (Public Health)

John Simpson – iMerit (Social Enterprise)

Josephine Helland – Akshara (Gender)

Kiara Feliz – Gram Vaani Community Media (Social Enterprise)

Kuljan Singh Chanambam – Sauhard (Human Rights)

Kushal Amin – Central Square Foundation (Education)

Lilianna Bagnoli – SocialCops (Education)

Marissa Harrison – MEDHA (Livelihoods)

Maxwell Kaufman – People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Natasha Ramanujam – Society for Nutrition, Education and Health Action (Public Health)

Nikki Richardson – People’s Watch/Jagori (Human Rights)

Owen Jollie – Indian Institute of Corporate Affairs (Corporate Social Responsibility)

Priyanka Murali – Thirumalai Charitable Trust (Public Health)

Rachel Varghese – My Choices (Education)

Rebecca Mukiibi – Profugo (Gender)

Sarah Manchanda – RIVER (Education)

Shriyam Gupta – Wildlife Conservation Society (Livelihoods)

Stanzin Saldon – Reaching Hand (Public Health)

Sylvia Gonzales – RIVER (Education)

Tucker Johnson – Aarohi (Public Health)

Udayan Philip – Pudiyador (Education)

2014-2015

Aanchal Aggarwal – Medha (Livelihoods)

Adam Pearlman – Shubham Housing Development Finance Company (Social Enterprise)

Alexander Hunt – Central Square Foundation (Education)

Alia Dharssi – Janaagraha (Other)

Andrew Jelinek – Anudip Foundation (Livelihoods)

Ashwin Advani – Society for Nutrition Education and Health Action (SNEHA) (Public Health)

Bradley Wintersteen – Dream a Dream (Other)

Charlotte Brown – Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (Education)

Christine Garcia – Central Square Foundation (Education)

Christopher Witschy – Mummy Daddy Media Pvt Ltd (Other)

Dustin Smith – Jagori (Other)

Elaine Colaco – Indian Institute of Corporate Affairs (IICA) (Other)

Eliel Talo – I Say Organic (Social Enterprise)

Frank Alexander – Wadhwani Foundation (Livelihoods)

Ilana Millner – American India Foundation (Other)

Indu Chelliah – SightLife (Public Health)

Jessica Meckler – The Akanksha Foundation (Education)

John Gibbons – Babajob.com (Social Enterprise)

Julia Wallin – Jharkhand State Livelihood Promotion Society (Livelihoods)

Kayalyn Kibbe – Yuwa India (Other)

Larry Reinhard Jr. – St. Xavier’s Non Formal Education Society (Public Health)

Laura Guzman – iMerit (Social Enterprise)

Laura Van Voorhees – Tata Consultancy Service (Livelihoods)

Marios Falaris – Yakjah Reconciliation and Development Network (Other)

Miriam HartmannCommunity Health and Advancement Initiative (CHAI)/Broadleaf Health and Education Alliance (Public Health)

Mrinal Mohanka – Babajob.com (Social Enterprise)

Pracheta Sharma – The K C Mahindra Trust (Education)

Raghav Anand – Sarvajal (Social Enterprise)

Ranu Nath – Tata Consultancy Service (Livelihoods)

Ryan Corrigan – Jagori Rural Charitable Trust (Livelihoods)

Sarah Manchanda – Rishi Valley Education Centre (RIVER) (Education)

Shubham Fitkariwala – Janaagraha (Other)

Shruti Manian – Ashoka University (Education)

Stephen Coger – People’s Watch (Other)

Vasundhara Jolly – Ashoka University (Education)

Virginia Morgan – KHAMIR (Livelihoods)

Vishal Aditya PotluriDr. Reddy’s Foundation (Livelihoods)

Vishnupriya Das – Gram Vaani (Other)

Yojna Lama – SwitchON-ONergy (Social Enterprise)

2013-14

Abhishek Choudhary, Anudip Foundation (Livelihoods)

Anastasia Aguiar, Central Square Foundation (Education)

Angela Kohama, Shaishav (Education)

Ashwin Advani, ICICI Foundation (Corporate Social Responsibility)

Brittany Boroian, Infrastructure Leasing & Financial Services Limited (IL&FS) (Livelihoods)

Caitlin Ferguson, Waste Ventures (Social Enterprise)

Cassie Denbow, Jagori Rural Charitable Trust (Livelihoods)

Dana “Coco” Vonnegut, Khamir (Livelihoods)

Dudhsagar Shambhuche, Swades Foundation (Other)

Edward “Ned” Dostaler, The Banyan Academy of Leadership in Mental Health (Public Health)

Eleanor Godfrey, Sujaya Schools (Education)

Gabrielle Trippe, Healing Fields Foundation (Public Health)

Gaytri Devi, Purbanchal Maitri Development Society (Livelihoods)

Ilana Millner, Apnalaya (Public Health)

James Liu, Babajob.com (Social Enterprise)

Jared Stancombe, Dream a Dream (Youth Development)

Julia LaFleur, SwitchON – ONergy (Social Enterprise)

Matthew Kelly, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (Education)

Megan Tara Casebolt, Community Health and Advancement Initiative (CHAI)/Broadleaf Health and Education Alliance (Public Health)

Meghana Rawat, Purbanchal Maitri Development Society (Livelihoods)

Meraj Ahmed, Community Health and Advancement Initiative (CHAI)/Broadleaf Health and Education Alliance (Public Health)

Michael Johnson, PBK Waste Solutions (Social Enterprise)

Mohit Raj, Nidan (Human Rights)

Neeraj Bachani, iMerit (Social Enterprise)

Nikhil Mahen, Aravind Eye Care System (Public Health)

Olivia Dowling, Utthan (Livelihoods)

Rorujorona Ferrell, Pravah (Youth Development)

Srijana Angdembey, Office to the Advisor to the Prime Minister (Livelihoods)

Swathi Sekar, Pudiyador (Education)

Tanvi Girotra, Aangan Trust (Youth Development)

Taylor Robinson, Wadhwani Foundation (Livelihoods)

Tera Meerkins, VOICE4Girls (Youth Development)

Vishwas Momle, Hippocampus Learning Centres (Education)

Zain Alam, 1947 Partition Archive (Education)

2012-2013

Aaron Samuel, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Aditya Pasumarty, Frontier Markets (Social Enterprise)

Allison Horton, Pravah (Youth Development)

Ambar Mehta, Ummeed (Public Health)

Andrew Fertig, Krishi Gram Vikas Kendra (KGVK) (Livelihood)

Anusha Raja, Sangath(Public Health)

Arunima Naithani, Broadleaf (Education)

Ashutosh Ranjan, Krishi Gram Vikas Kendra (KGVK) (Livelihood)

Bipin Rawat, Tata Steel Rural Development Society (Public Health)

Blessing Okorougo, Centre for Social Research (Human Rights)

Brian Tronic, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Elizabeth Peyton, ONergy (Social Enterprise)

Emily Coady, Rishi Valley Institute for Educational Resources (Education)

Gaurang Raval, Utthan (Livelihood)

Gayatri Eassey, National Council on Skills Development (Livelihood)

Gregory Randolph, Micro Home Solutions (Social Enterprise)

Hallie Noble, Anudip (Livelihood)

Jean-Camille de la Cruz Kollmorgen, Broadleaf (Public Health)

Jilna Kothary, Kachchh Heritage Arts and Crafts, Music and Integrated Resources (KHAMIR) (Livelihood)

Katie Stricker, ICICI Foundation (Advocacy)

Khushi Malhotra, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (Education)

Manleen Sandhu, Guru Nanak Dev University (Education)

Marina Yakhnis, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education)

Mohd Ali, Pudiyador (Education)

Nimish Shukla, Dasra (Social Enterprise)

Pranav Reddy, Calcutta Kids (Public Health)

Prerna Khanna, Magic Bus (Youth Development)

Ragini Kathail, Arghyam (Environment)

Ramaa Chitale, Society for Education Action and Research (SEARCH) (Public Health)

Ryan Ballard, Magic Bus (Youth Development)

Sabina Dewan, SAATH (Livelihood)

Sam Ribnick, Anudip (Social Enterprise)

Sanjana Tandon, Micro Home Solutions (Social Enterprise)

Shilpa Vimalananda, Society for Education Action and Research (SEARCH) (Public Health)

Sriya Srikrishnan, Calcutta Kids (Public Health)

Swathi Venkatesh, Janagraha (Advocacy)

2011-2012

Aarti Nuzella, Anudip Foundation (Livelihood)

Aliza Lailari, Healing Fields Foundation (Public Health)

Amber Luong, Rishi Valley (Public Health)

Archana Patel, Tata Consultancy Service (Social Enterprise)

Ashley Pandya, Dasra (Social Enterprise)

Bhumi Purohit, Learn it Live (Social Enterprise)

Carson Marries, Self-Reliant Initiatives through Joint Action (SRIJAN) (Livelihood)

Jennifer Chowdhury, Jeevika Development Society (Human Rights)

Jessica Mausner, Akanksha (Education)

Kanupriya Tandon, Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST) AIF (Livelihood)

Krupa Asher, Anudip Foundation (Livelihood)

Lauren Lauter, Muktangan (Education)

Lorenz Noe, Micro Home Solutions (Social Enterprise)

Mandy LaBreche, Solidarity and Action Against the HIV Infection in India (SAATHII) (Public Health)

Maressa McCall, Pravah (Youth Development)

Margy Elliot, Calcutta Kids (Public Health)

Marina Yakhnis, AIF Digital Education (Education)

Megan Gordon, Action Research and Training for Health (ARTH) (Public Health)

Michael Matergia, Community Health and Advancement Initiative (Public Health)

Michael Schulte, Empower Pragati (Social Enterprise)

Nikita Arora, Krishi Gram Vikas Kendra (KGVK) (Public Health)

Ramya Naraharisetti, Society for Elimination of Rural Poverty (SERP) (Livelihood)

Ryan Ballard, Magic Bus (Youth Development)

Sara Tiffany, Aarohi (Livelihood)

Sarah Connette, Jagori Grameen (Livelihood)

Sukanya Purkayastha, Magic Bus (Youth Development)

Tracy Wares, Video Volunteers (Human Rights)

Veronica Weis, Breakthrough (Human Rights)

Vlad Kuperman, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

2010-2011

Adam Campbell, Anudip Foundation (Livelihood)

Alison Chatfield, Krishi Gram Vikas Kendra (KGVK)  (Public Health)

Andrew Carreras, Jagori Grameen (Livelihood)

Christina MacGillivray, Breakthrough (Human Rights)

Elijah Monroe, Ashoka Youth Venture (Youth Development)

Hilary Fischer-Groban, ICICI Foundation (Corporate Social Responsibility)

Jessica Ré, Katha (Education)

John Stokes, Naz Foundation (Public Health)

John Van Rooy, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Joseph Stromberg, Pravah (Youth Development)

Kathleen Mitchell, Tata Steel Rural Development Society (TSRDS) (Livelihood)

Kathryn Osterhage, Solidarity and Action Against the HIV Infection in India (SAATHII) (Public Health)

Kishore Eechambadi, Seva Mandir (Livelihood)

Kyla Donnely, Action Research and Training for Health (ARTH) (Public Health)

Leviticus Turner, Hand in Hand (Livelihood)

Lindsey Adkisson, Rishi Valley Rural Health Centre (Public Health)

Marielle Amrhein, Katha (Education)

Rajwant Virk, Centre for Social Research (Social Enterprise)

Ramya Sekaran, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Renagh O’Leary, Jagori (Other)

Stephanie Dorman, Digantar (Education)

Tejpal Dhillon, Vatsalya (Livelihood)

2009-2010

Aditi Ramakrishnan, Banyan (Public Health)

Annelyse Ahmad, Y. R. Gaitonde Care (Public Health)

April Yee, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education)

Behzad Larry, Nidan (Livelihood, Envrionment)

Bijal Shah, SAATH (Livelihood)

Charles Iannuzzi, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Jenny Becksted, Seva Mandir (Livelihood)

Jessica Sawhney, Anudip Foundation (Livelihood)

Kirsten Anderson, AID India (Public Health)

Lavina Shahani, ICCI Center for Child Health and Nutrition (Public Health)

Meghna Shah, SAATH (Livelihood)

Nafisa Ferdous, Jeevika Development Society (Human Rights)

Nandan Satyanarayan, Dream a Dream (Education)

Nicole Fox, Y. R. Gaitonde Care (Public Health)

Nikolai Smith, Janaagraha (Livelihood)

Renita Shah, Kachchh Heritage Arts and Crafts, Music and Integrated Resources (KHAMIR) (Livelihood)

Samir Panjwani, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Sanjay Sharma, Roshan Vikas (Livelihood)

Tatiana Rostovtseva,  Rishi Valley Institute for Educational Resources (RIVER) (Education)

Tejas (Neel) Odedara, Ashoka Youth Venture (Youth Development)

2008-2009

Carolyn Florey, Breakthrough (Human Rights)

Clara Presler, Centre for Social Research (Social Enterprise)

Diane Coffey, Yusuf Meherally Centre (Livelihood)

Diego Solares, Saheli (Human Rights, Public Health)

Ekta Dharia, Navsarjan (Human Rights)

Hamsa Subramaniam, Solidarity and Action Against the HIV Infection in India (SAATHII) (Public Health)

Hemant Sharma, AIF Rickshaw Sangh (Livelihood)

Joy Mischley, Deep Griha Society (Human Rights)

Kalpana Simhan, Dr. Reddy’s Foundation for Health (Public Health)

Kirsten Anderson, AID India (Public Health)

Matt (Howard) French, Kumaon Agriculture and Greenery Advancement Society (Livelihood)

Meera Sinha, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education)

Michael Yau, Seva Mandir (Livelihood)

Natassia Rozario, Saath (Education)

Neela (Anindita) Pal, Prayasam (Education)

Nina Maturu, Akanksha (Education)

Pooja Bhatia, Berojgar Mahila Seva Samiti (BMSS) (Livelihood)

Praveen Basaviah, South India AIDS Action Programme (SIAAP) (Public Health)

Rick Desai, SAATH (Livelihood)

Sophie (Ann) Namy, Kumaon Agrictulture and Greeny Advancement Society (Public Health)

Suzanne Rizzo, Mann Deshi (Livelihood)

Tahmid Chowdhury, Solidarity and Action Against the HIV Infection in India (SAATHII) (Public Health)

2007-2008

Alissa Pelc, Sahara (Public Health)

Ann Levy, Janarth (Education)

Arun Gupta, Seva Mandir (Livelihood)

Brenna Schneider, Kachchh Heritage Arts and Crafts, Music and Integrated Resources (KHAMIR) (Livelihood)

Brian Heilman, Street Survivors India (Education)

Chad Robertson, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Christine Least, CARE India (Public Health)

Diana Chester, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education)

Erin Huffer, Samraksha (Public Health)

Gia Cobb, Child Health Education Society (CHES) (Public Health)

Ja Eun Huh, Nalamdana (Public Health)

Jeena Shah, Navsarjan (Human Rights)

Jimmy Ossman, Unitus – Ujjivan Financial Services (Livelihood)

Katherine Potter, MAMTA Health Institute for Mother and Child (Public Health)

Krishna Parthasarathy, AID India (Public Health)

Laurie Mason, Bodh Shiksha Samiti (Education)

Leila Bozorg, SAATH (Livelihood)

Maria Kasparian, Street Survivors India (Education)

Megan Mcdrew, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Menaka Mohan, Samaj Parivartana Samudaya (Human Rights)

Menal Jham, Y.R. Gaitonde Care (Public Health)

Nafessa Kassim, LEPRA India (Livelihood)

Naina Arora, Swechha (Education)

Rebecca Shively, Mann Deshi  (Livelihood)

Sara Rotkin, Deep Griha (Human Rights)

Sarah Hine, Muse Spiti Ecosphere (Livelihood)

Sumit Galhotra, Sangama (Public Health)

Vaani Garg, Saheli (Public Health)

Vanitha Sivarajan, Dhan Foundation (Livelihood)

2006-2007

Ajaita Shah, Unitus – Ujjivan Financial Services (Livelihood)

Ann Varghese, Sahara Aalhad Center for Care and Rehabilitation (Public Health)

Bhavana Nancherla, LEPRA India (Livelihood)

Emily Carlson Lindsay, Aman Biradari (Human Rights)

Husna Ali-Khan, Byrraju Foundation (Social Enterprise)
Jordan Fletcher, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Julia De Quadros, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Kasey Kozara, Sahayog (Human Rights)

Kevin Cremin, Centre for Advocacy in Mental Health (Human Rights)

Kiran Bains, Vigyan Foundation (Human Rights)

Kristy Singer, People’s Institute for Development and Training (Livelihood)

Lydia (Butts) Barraza, Sahara Aalhad Center for Care and Rehabilitation (Human Rights)

Marjorie Schulman, Reach India (Livelihood)

Nicole Patel, Kutch Mahila Vikas Sangathan Bhuj (KMVS) (Public Health)

Rushabh Kapashi, Sandhi Craft (Livelihood)

Sabrina Singh, Breakthrough (Human Rights)

Solmaz Firoz, South India Cell for Human Rights Education and Monitoring (Human Rights)

Sonia Cheruvillil, Sangama (Public Health)

Subarna Mukherjee, Sahara Aalhad Center for Care and Rehabilitation (Public Health)

Tanwi Nandini Islam, Pravah (Education)

Vikas Raj, Unitus – Ujjivan Financial Services (Livelihood)

Vivek Taparia, SKS Microfinance (Livelihood)

Yael Gottlieb, Action India (Livelihood)

Yamini Rao, Byrraju Foundation (Education)

2005-2006

Aditi Desai, Utthan (Human Rights)

Andy Melendez Salgado, Child in Need Institute (CINI) (Education, Public Health)

Ben Lenzner, Rural Litigation & Entitlement Kendra (RLEK) (Education, Livelihood)

Catherine Garoupa, Rural Litigation and Entitlement Kendra (RLEK) (Livelihood)

Cheryl Young, Saath (Livelihood)

Chris Turillo, SKS Microfinance (Livelihood)

Jennifer Leonard, SKS Microfinance (Livelihood)

Jillian Waid, Kutch Mahila Vikas Sangathan Bhuj (Public Health)

Kirstin Henninger, Navranchna (Education)

Lauren Logiuidice, Karnatka Health Protection Trust (KHPT)/Sangama (Public Health)

Lee Dula, Seva Mandir (Livelihood)

Margarette Shegog, Child in Need Institute (CINI) (Education, Public Health)

Piali Mukhopadyay, Indian Network for People Living with HIV/AIDS (Public Health)

Puja Gupta, Bodh Shiksha Samiti (Education)

Samantha Iyer, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Sejal Patel, Action Aid India (Education)

Shalu Umapathy, Bhoomika Trust (Livelihood)

Sheela Shrinivas, Pravah (Education)

Tatjana Johnson, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Vikram Fielding-Singh, Digantar (Education)

2004-2005

Anuj Jaggi, MAMTA Health Institute for Mothers (Public Health)

Arun Gopal, Y.R. Gaitonde Care (Public Health)

Caroline Custer, Seva Mandir (Livelihood)

Charolotte Lapsansky, Pravah (Education)

Dan Vazquez, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Fareen Walji, South Indian Cell for Human Rights (Human Rights)

Han Kang, India-Canda Collaborative HIV/AIDS Prevention Programme (Public Health)

Harpreet Anand, Seva Mandir (Livelihood)

Jeremy Carl, The Energy and Resources Institute (Social Enterprise)

Jonathon Ripley, South India AIDS Action Program (Public Health)

Leigh Kincaid, Jiva (Public Health)

Mangayarkarasi Arumugam, Movement for Alternatives and Youth Awareness (MAYA) (Education)

Mujtaba Saifuddin, Deepalaya (Education)

Neilesh Shelat, South India AIDS Action Programme (Public Health)

Nikolaus Steinberg, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Patrick Toomey, SAATH (Livelihood)

Rinoti Amin, Navrachna (Livelihood)

Sapana Parikh, SEWA Bharat (Livelihood)

Sarah Rizvi, Shelter Associates (Social Enterprise)

Saritha Peruri, Grameen Koota (Social Enterprise)

Shelly Hundiwal, Jiva (Public Health)

Veena Villivalam, Movement for Alternatives and Youth Awareness (MAYA) (Education)

Vivek Jayadeva, Karuna Trust (Education)

2003-2004

Aalap Shah, South India AIDS Action Programme (Public Health)

Amanpreet Kaur, Navrachna (Livelihood)

Arjun Garg, Navrachna (Livelihood)

Catherine Kannam, Praxis (Human Rights)

David Fuente, Self-Employed Women’s Association (SEWA) (Livelihood)

Dylan Smith, People’s Watch (Human Rights)

Emily Vedaa, Karuna Trust (Education, Public Health)

Emma Aller, Creating Resources for Empowerment in Action (CREA) (Social Enterprise)

James Long, Action Aid India (Education)

Marc ALongi, Ashram Paryavaran Vidyalaya (APV) School (Education)

Maulik Shah, Deepalaya (Education)

Monika Doshi, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (Education)

Nivedita Patel, Amber Mahila Benefit Association (Livelihood)

Payal Shah, Pratham (Education)

Priya Vellanki, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Purvi Tank, SEWA Swashrayi Mahila Cooperative Bank (Livelihood)

Sameena Azhar, MAMTA Health Institute for Mother and Child (Public Health)

Sucharita Kuchibhotla, South India Cell for Human Rights Education and Monitoring (Human Rights)

Vimala Palaniswamy, Dhan Foundation (Livelihood)

2002-2003

Anita Agarwal, SEWA Bharat (Livelihood)

Anita Nabha, Akanksha (Education)

Carole Geiger, Tata Steel Rural Development Society (Livelihood)

Goral Vaidya, Kala Raksha (Livelihood)

India Reed Bowers, National Center for Advocacy Studies (Social Enterprise)

Jessica Mayberry, Self-Employed Women’s Associaiton (SEWA) (Livelihood)

John Edwards, Sustainable Environment & Ecological Development Society (SEEDS) (Social Enterprise)

Karishma Huda, Insititute for Motiviating Self-Employment (Livelihood)

Pragnya Alekal, AID India (Education, Health)

Rachna Singh, Gramin Vilas Vigyan Samiti (Livelihood, Environment)

Rina Patel Arora, Goa Sudharop (Education)

Rishi Arora, SKS Microfinance (Livelihood)

Seema Dargar, Center for Budget and Policy Studies (Social Enterprise)

Sheila Chanani, Tata Steel Rural Development Society

Siddharth Tickoo, Goa Sudharop (Education)

Subhalakshmi Ganguly, Tata Steel Rural Development Society (Livelihood)

Valerie Hart, Institute for Motivating Self-Employment (IMSE) (Livelihood)

Virginia Sanders, Tamil Nadu Science Forum (Other)

2002

Anu Pillai, SKS Microfinance (Livelihood)

Dana Pillai, Gramin Vilas Vigyan Smiti (GRAVIS) (Livelihood, Environment)

Deepa Bhat, Karuna Trust (Education)

Dinika Mirpuri, Youth for Unity and Voluntary Awareness (YUVA) (Livelihood)

Jasmine Khambatta, Youth for Unity and Voluntary Awareness (YUVA) (Livelihood)

Jhumka Gupta, Akanksha (Education)

Krishanti Vignarajah, Youth for Unity and Voluntary Awareness (YUVA) (Livelihood)

Samantha Shahani, Akanksha (Education)

Shilesh Muralidhara, Youth for Unity and Voluntary Awareness (YUVA) (Livelihood)

Siddharth Gejji, Goa Sudharop (Education)

Sonali Patel, SAATH (Livelihood)

Zahir Janmohamed, SAATH (Livelihood)

2001

Amarish Mehta, Abhiyan (Education)

Chaitali Thakar, Art of Living (Social Enterprise)

Gautam Desai, Abhiyan (Education)

Hans Thomas, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education)

Kimberly Parekh, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education)

Lucas Dreier, Abhiyan (Education)

Manish Kakwani, Abhiyan (Education)

Manju Sadarangani, Self-Employwed Women’s Association (SEWA) (Livelihood)

Mayhul Jain, Vikenanand Research and Training Institute (VRTI) (Livelihood)

Meenakshi Verma Agrawal, Kala Raksha (Livelihood)

Nehal Patel, Self-Employwed Women’s Association (SEWA) (Livelihood)

Nisha Gupta, Abhiyan (Education)

Nisha Varia, Abhiyan (Education)

Paul Anand, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education)

Rachna Mathur, AIF Digital Equalizer (Education

Sachin Shah, Vyakti Vikas Kendra (Education, Health)

Shayna Parekh, Veerayatan (Education)

Shilpa Punatar, Self-Employwed Women’s Association (SEWA) (Livelihood)

Shruti Haldea, Abhiyan (Education)

Tanvi Pandit, Kala Raksha (Livelihood)

Vikas Mehta, Abhiyan (Education)

Selection Criteria

Thank you for your interest in the AIF William J. Clinton Fellowship.
The application for the 2017-2018 class is now open.
To apply, please select the “Apply” Tab Above.

OPEN TO U.S. CITIZENS, INDIAN CITIZENS, AND U.S. PERMANENT RESIDENTS

Application Deadline: January 16, 2017

Selection Process

We conduct a rigorous review process to evaluate candidates for suitability for the program. The AIF Clinton Fellowship is highly competitive, and the 2016-17 acceptance rate was 7%. The selection process takes place between January and April 2017, with in-person interviews being conducted in March. During the selection process, we take note of the skill sets and career aspirations of potential Fellows to match them with appropriate AIF partner organizations.

After review of online applications, selected applicants will be longlisted, and invited for in-person interviews. Interviews will be held in select locations in the United States and India.

After the completion of interviews, AIF will notifythe shortlist for the Fellowship and open the project application portal. Finalists on the shortlist have the opportunity to apply for up to threeprojects with AIF partner organizations. AIF and its partner organizations will interview candidates for each position, and will make final Fellowship offers based on the best possible matches for the project. Once the matching process is complete, and the candidate offered a position with a project, they will officiallybe admitted into the Fellowship program in April 2017.

Eligibility

Applicants must:

• Be a U.S. or Indian citizen, or a U.S. permanent resident

• Be between the ages of 21 and 34 on September 1, 2017.

• Have completed an undergraduate degreebefore the start of the program on September 1, 2017

Qualifications

We seek applicants from a variety of backgrounds, both professionally and personally.

Candidates should demonstrate a deep interest, passion, and commitment to social and economic development in India. Candidates must show humility and an eagerness to learn within a cross-cultural context. Ideal candidates possess strong professional skills, relevant volunteer or other practical experience, and applicable academic credentials or training. They show a potential for leadership and are entrepreneurial, innovative, and creative in finding solutions and navigating unknown environments.

Candidates must be flexible and adaptable, and possess exceptional ability to build meaningful relationships across cultures in the social development space. A sensitivity and ability to work with vulnerable communities as well as the humility and passion to “learn by doing” is essential.

Although proficiency in an Indian language is not required to apply, it is highly desirable.

Please read our FAQs to learn more about the application process and get answers to commonly asked questions about the program.

Questions?

Please contact us at fellowship@aif.org

Or, join Staff and Alumni for a virtual info session to learn about the program, how to complete your application, and hear highlights from current projects.

U.S. Applicants: For December 8, 2016, RSVP here. For January 10, 2017, RSVP here.

Indian Applicants: For December 14, 2016, RSVP here For January 10, 2017, RSVP here.